Main  Contacts  
Table of contents
Coming Home
Old Friends with New Faces
Miss Campbell
Thorns Among the Roses
Prince Charming
Polishing Mac
Phebe
Breakers Ahead
New Year's Calls
The Sad and Sober Part
Small Temptations
At Kitty's Ball
Both Sides
Aunt Clara's Plan
Alas for Charlie!
Good Works
Among the Haycocks
Which Was It?
Behind the Fountain
What Mac Did
How Phebe Earned Her Welcome
Short and Sweet

women love to give more than they receive, caused her to feel as if 

in a measure this man's fate lay in her hands, to be decided for 

good or ill through her. How should she be true both to him and to 

herself? 

 

Before this question could be answered, he was back again, 

looking as if he had left his care behind him, for his moods varied 

like the wind. Her attitude, as she stood motionless and alone with 

downcast face, was so unlike the cheerful creature who came to 

meet him an hour ago, it filled him with self-reproach, and, 

coming up, he drew one hand through his arm, saying, as she 

involuntarily followed him, "You must not stand still. Forget my 

heroics and answer my question. Will you go with us, Rose?" 

 

"Not now that is asking too much, Charlie, and I will promise 

nothing, because I cannot do it honestly," she answered, so firmly 

that he knew appeal was useless. 

 

"Am I to go alone, then, leaving all I care for behind me?" 

 

"No, take your mother with you, and do your best to reunite your 

parents. You could not give yourself to a better task." 

 

"She won't go without you." 

 

"I think she will if you hold fast to your resolution. You won't give 

that up, I hope?" 

 

"No I must go somewhere, for I can't stay here, and it may as well 

be India, since that pleases Father," answered Charlie doggedly. 

 

"It will more than you can imagine. Tell him all the truth, and see 

how glad he will be to help you, and how sincerely he will respect 

you for what you've done." 

 

"If you respect me, I don't care much about the opinion of anyone 

else," answered Charlie, clinging with a lover's pertinacity to the 

hope that was dearest. 

 

"I shall, if you go manfully away and do the duty you owe your 

father and yourself." 

 

"And when I've done it, may I come back to be rewarded, Rose?" 

he asked, taking possession of the hand on his arm as if it was 

already his. 

 

"I wish I could say what you want me to. But how can I promise 

when I am not sure of anything? I don't love you as I ought, and 

perhaps I never shall so why persist in making me bind myself in 

this way? Be generous, Charlie, and don't ask it," implored Rose, 

much afflicted by his persistence. 


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