Main  Contacts  
Table of contents
Coming Home
Old Friends with New Faces
Miss Campbell
Thorns Among the Roses
Prince Charming
Polishing Mac
Phebe
Breakers Ahead
New Year's Calls
The Sad and Sober Part
Small Temptations
At Kitty's Ball
Both Sides
Aunt Clara's Plan
Alas for Charlie!
Good Works
Among the Haycocks
Which Was It?
Behind the Fountain
What Mac Did
How Phebe Earned Her Welcome
Short and Sweet

has dropped asleep at last. I've sent for Steve and the other boys. 

There will be time for them later, but he so begged to see you now, 

I thought it best to come while this temporary strength keeps him 

up. I have told him how it is, but he will not believe me. If he asks 

you, answer honestly and try to fit him a little for this sudden 

ending of so many hopes." 

 

"How soon, Uncle?" 

 

"A few hours, probably. This tranquil moment is yours make the 

most of it and, when we can do no more for him, we'll comfort one 

another." 

 

Mac met them in the hall, but Rose hardly saw him. She was 

conscious only of the task before her and, when her uncle led her 

to the door, she said quietly, "Let me go in alone, please." 

 

Archie, who had been hanging over the bed, slipped away into the 

inner room as she appeared, and Rose found Charlie waiting for 

her with such a happy face, she could not believe what she had 

heard and found it easy to say almost cheerfully as she took his 

eager hand in both of hers: "Dear Charlie, I'm so glad you sent for 

me. I longed to come, but waited till you were better. You surely 

are?" she added, as a second glance showed to her the 

indescribable change which had come upon the face which at first 

seemed to have both light and color in it. 

 

"Uncle says not, but I think he is mistaken, because the agony is all 

gone, and except for this odd sinking now and then, I don't feel so 

much amiss," he answered feebly but with something of the old 

lightness in his voice. 

 

"You will hardly be able to sail in the Rajah, I fear, but you won't 

mind waiting a little while we nurse you," said poor Rose, trying to 

talk on quietly, with her heart growing heavier every minute. 

 

"I shall go if I'm carried! I'll keep that promise, though it costs me 

my life. Oh, Rose! You know? They've told you?" And, with a 

sudden memory of what brought him there, he hid his face in the 

pillow. 

 

"You broke no promise, for I would not let you make one, you 

remember. Forget all that, and let us talk about the better time that 

may be coming for you." 

 

"Always so generous, so kind!" he murmured, with her hand 

against his feverish cheek; then, looking up, he went on in a tone 


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