Main  Contacts  
Table of contents
Coming Home
Old Friends with New Faces
Miss Campbell
Thorns Among the Roses
Prince Charming
Polishing Mac
Phebe
Breakers Ahead
New Year's Calls
The Sad and Sober Part
Small Temptations
At Kitty's Ball
Both Sides
Aunt Clara's Plan
Alas for Charlie!
Good Works
Among the Haycocks
Which Was It?
Behind the Fountain
What Mac Did
How Phebe Earned Her Welcome
Short and Sweet

 

But Charlie changed the subject skillfully by exclaiming with an 

anxious expression: "I do believe you are going to be like Aunt 

Jane, for that's just the way she comes down on me whenever she 

gets the chance! Don't take her for a model, I beg she is a good 

woman but a mighty disagreeable one in my humble opinion." 

 

The fear of being disagreeable is a great bugbear to a girl, as this 

artful young man well knew, and Rose fell into the trap at once, 

for Aunt Jane was far from being her model, though she could not 

help respecting her worth. 

 

"Have you given up your painting?" she asked rather abruptly, 

turning to a gilded Fra Angelico angel which leaned in the sofa 

corner. 

 

"Sweetest face I ever saw, and very like you about the eyes, isn't 

it?" said Charlie, who seemed to have a Yankee trick of replying to 

one question with another. 

 

"I want an answer, not a compliment," and Rose tried to look 

severe as she put away the picture more quickly than she had taken 

it up. 

 

"Have I given up painting? Oh, no! I daub a little in oils, slop a 

little in watercolors, sketch now and then, and poke about the 

studios when the artistic fit comes on." 

 

"How is the music?" 

 

"More flourishing. I don't practice much, but sing a good deal in 

company. Set up a guitar last summer and went troubadouring 

round in great style. The girls like it, and it's jolly among the 

fellows." 

 

"Are you studying anything?" 

 

"Well, I have some lawbooks on my table good, big, wise-looking 

chaps and I take a turn at them semioccasionally when pleasure 

palls or parents chide. But I doubt if I do more than learn what 'a 

allybi' is this year," and a sly laugh in Charlie's eye suggested that 

he sometimes availed himself of this bit of legal knowledge. 

 

"What do you do then?" 

 

"Fair catechist, I enjoy myself. Private theatricals have been the 

rage of late, and I have won such laurels that I seriously think of 

adopting the stage as my profession." 

 

"Really!" cried Rose, alarmed. 

 

"Why not? If I must go to work, isn't that as good as anything?" 

 

"Not without more talent than I think you possess. With genius one 

can do anything without it one had better let the stage alone." 


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