Main  Contacts  
Table of contents
Coming Home
Old Friends with New Faces
Miss Campbell
Thorns Among the Roses
Prince Charming
Polishing Mac
Phebe
Breakers Ahead
New Year's Calls
The Sad and Sober Part
Small Temptations
At Kitty's Ball
Both Sides
Aunt Clara's Plan
Alas for Charlie!
Good Works
Among the Haycocks
Which Was It?
Behind the Fountain
What Mac Did
How Phebe Earned Her Welcome
Short and Sweet

admiration never felt before, for Mac was the plainest of all the 

cousins. 

 

"I don't know about that, but I have my dreams and aspirations, 

and some of them are pretty high ones. Aim at the best, you know, 

and keep climbing if you want to get on," he said, looking at the 

asters with an inward sort of smile, as if he and they had some 

sweet secret between them. 

 

"You are queerer than ever. But I like your ambition, and hope you 

will get on. Only mustn't you begin at something soon? I fancied 

you would study medicine with Uncle that used to be our plan, you 

know." 

 

"I shall, for the present at least, because I quite agree with you that 

it is necessary to have an anchor somewhere and not go floating 

off into the world of imagination without ballast of the right sort. 

Uncle and I had some talk about it last night and I'm going to begin 

as soon as possible, for I've mooned long enough," and giving 

himself a shake, Mac threw down the pretty spray, adding half 

aloud: 

 

"Chide me not, laborious band, 

For the idle flowers I brought: 

 

Every aster in my hand 

Goes home laden with a thought." 

 

Rose caught the words and smiled, thinking to herself, "Oh, that's 

it he is getting into the sentimental age and Aunt Jane has been 

lecturing him. Dear me, how we are growing up!" 

 

"You look as if you didn't like the prospect very well," she said 

aloud, for Mac had rammed the volume of Shelley into his pocket 

and the glorified expression was so entirely gone, Rose fancied she 

had been mistaken about the mountaintop behind the mists. 

 

"Yes, well enough I always thought the profession a grand one, 

and where could I find a better teacher than Uncle? I've got into 

lazy ways lately, and it is high time I went at something useful, so 

here I go," and Mac abruptly vanished into the study while Rose 

joined Phebe in Aunt Plenty's room. 

 

The dear old lady had just decided, after long and earnest 

discussion, which of six favorite puddings should be served for 

dinner, and thus had a few moments to devote to sentiment, so 

when Rose came in she held out her arms, saying fondly: "I shall 

not feel as if I'd got my child back again until I have her in my lap 


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