Main  Contacts  
Table of contents
Coming Home
Old Friends with New Faces
Miss Campbell
Thorns Among the Roses
Prince Charming
Polishing Mac
Phebe
Breakers Ahead
New Year's Calls
The Sad and Sober Part
Small Temptations
At Kitty's Ball
Both Sides
Aunt Clara's Plan
Alas for Charlie!
Good Works
Among the Haycocks
Which Was It?
Behind the Fountain
What Mac Did
How Phebe Earned Her Welcome
Short and Sweet

middle in his most gallant style. Landing safely at the bottom, she 

stood aside to let him get his breath, for stout Uncle Mac was 

bound to do or die on that occasion and would have danced his 

pumps through without a murmur if she had desired it. 

 

Leaning against the wall with his hair in his eyes, and a decidedly 

bored expression of countenance, was Mac, Jr., who had been 

surveying the gymnastics of his parent with respectful 

astonishment. 

 

"Come and take a turn, my lad. Rose is fresh as a daisy, but we old 

fellows soon get enough of it, so you shall have my place," said his 

father, wiping his face, which glowed like a cheerful peony. 

 

"No, thank you, sir I can't stand that sort of thing. I'll race you 

round the piazza with pleasure, Cousin, but his oven is too much 

for me," was Mac's uncivil reply as he backed toward the open 

window, as if glad of an excuse to escape. 

 

"Fragile creature, don't stay on my account, I beg. I can't leave my 

guests for a moonlight run, even if I dared to take it on a frosty 

night in a thin dress," said Rose, fanning herself and not a bit 

ruffled by Mac's refusal, for she knew his ways and they amused 

her. 

 

"Not half so bad as all this dust, gas, heat, and noise. What do you 

suppose lungs are made of?" demanded Mac, ready for a 

discussion then and there. 

 

"I used to know, but I've forgotten now. Been so busy with other 

things that I've neglected the hobbies I used to ride five or six years 

ago," she said, laughing. 

 

"Ah, those were times worth having! Are you going in for much of 

this sort of thing, Rose?" he asked with a disapproving glance at 

the dancers. 

 

"About three months of it, I think." 

 

"Then good-bye till New Year." And Mac vanished behind the 

curtains. 

 

"Rose, my dear, you really must take that fellow in hand before he 

gets to be quite a bear. Since you have been gone he has lived in 

his books and got on so finely that we have let him alone, though 

his mother groans over his manners. Polish him up a bit, I beg of 

you, for it is high time he mended his odd ways and did justice to 

the fine gifts he hides behind them," said Uncle Mac, scandalized 


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