Main  Contacts  
Table of contents
Coming Home
Old Friends with New Faces
Miss Campbell
Thorns Among the Roses
Prince Charming
Polishing Mac
Phebe
Breakers Ahead
New Year's Calls
The Sad and Sober Part
Small Temptations
At Kitty's Ball
Both Sides
Aunt Clara's Plan
Alas for Charlie!
Good Works
Among the Haycocks
Which Was It?
Behind the Fountain
What Mac Did
How Phebe Earned Her Welcome
Short and Sweet

I'll never let dawn catch me out in such a plight anymore." 

 

"You were all right enough, for mother didn't object and I got you 

both home before daylight. Uncle is notional about such things, so 

I shouldn't mind, for we had a jolly time and we were none the 

worse for it." 

 

"Indeed we were, every one of us! Aunt Clara hasn't gotten over 

her cold yet. I slept all the next day, and you looked like a ghost, 

for you'd been out every night for weeks, I think." 

 

"Oh, nonsense! Everyone does it during the season, and you'll get 

used to the pace very soon," began Charlie, bent on making her go, 

for he was in his element in a ballroom and never happier than 

when he had his pretty cousin on his arm. 

 

"Ah! But I don't want to get used to it, for it costs too much in the 

end. I don't wish to get used to being whisked about a hot room by 

men who have taken too much wine, to turn day into night, 

wasting time that might be better spent, and grow into a 

fashionable fast girl who can't get along without excitement. I don't 

deny that much of it is pleasant, but don't try to make me too fond 

of gaiety. Help me to resist what I know is hurtful, and please don't 

laugh me out of the good habits Uncle has tried so hard to give 

me." 

 

Rose was quite sincere in her appeal, and Charlie knew she was 

right, but he always found it hard to give up anything he had set his 

heart on, no matter how trivial, for the maternal indulgence which 

had harmed the boy had fostered the habit of self-indulgence, 

which was ruining the man. So when Rose looked up at him, with 

a very honest desire to save him as well as herself from being 

swept into the giddy vortex which keeps so many young people 

revolving aimlessly, till they go down or are cast upon the shore, 

wrecks of what they might have been, he gave a shrug and 

answered briefly: "As you please. I'll bring you home as early as 

you like, and Effie Waring shall take your place in the German. 

What flowers shall I send you?" 

 

Now, that was an artful speech of Charlie's, for Miss Waring was a 

fast and fashionable damsel who openly admired Prince Charming 

and had given him the name. Rose disliked her and was sure her 


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