Main  Contacts  
Table of contents
Coming Home
Old Friends with New Faces
Miss Campbell
Thorns Among the Roses
Prince Charming
Polishing Mac
Phebe
Breakers Ahead
New Year's Calls
The Sad and Sober Part
Small Temptations
At Kitty's Ball
Both Sides
Aunt Clara's Plan
Alas for Charlie!
Good Works
Among the Haycocks
Which Was It?
Behind the Fountain
What Mac Did
How Phebe Earned Her Welcome
Short and Sweet

eye, and exclaiming, "What's this? What's this?" he snatched up a 

photograph which lay half under a pile of letters with foreign 

postmarks. 

 

"Oh! I forgot that was there," said Rose hastily. 

 

"Who is the man?" demanded Charlie, eyeing the good-looking 

countenance before him with a frown. 

 

"That is the Honorable Gilbert Murray, who went up the Nile with 

us and shot crocodiles and other small game, being a mighty 

hunter, as I told you in my letters," answered Rose gaily, though ill 

pleased at the little discovery just then, for this had been one of the 

narrow escapes her uncle spoke of. 

 

"And they haven't eaten him yet, I infer from the pile of letters?" 

said Charlie jealously. 

 

"I hope not. His sister did not mention it when she wrote last." 

 

"Ah! Then she is your correspondent? Sisters are dangerous things 

sometimes." And Charlie eyed the packet suspiciously. 

 

"In this case, a very convenient thing, for she tells me all about her 

brother's wedding, as no one else would take the trouble to do." 

 

"Oh! Well, if he's married, I don't care a straw about him. I fancied 

I'd found out why you are such a hard-hearted charmer. But if there 

is no secret idol, I'm all at sea again." And Charlie tossed the 

photograph into the drawer as if it no longer interested him. 

 

"I'm hard-hearted because I'm particular and, as yet, do not find 

anyone at all to my taste." 

 

"No one?" with a tender glance. 

 

"No one" with a rebellious blush, and the truthful addition "I see 

much to admire and like in many persons, but none quite strong 

and good enough to suit me. My heroes are old-fashioned, you 

know." 

 

"Prigs, like Guy Carleton, Count Altenberg, and John Halifax I 

know the pattern you goody girls like," sneered Charlie, who 

preferred the Guy Livingston, Beauclerc, and Rochester style. 

 

"Then I'm not a 'goody girl,' for I don't like prigs. I want a 

gentleman in the best sense of the word, and I can wait, for I've 

seen one, and know there are more in the world." 

 

"The deuce you have! Do I know him?" asked Charlie, much 

alarmed. 

 

"You think you do," answered Rose with a mischievous sparkle in 

her eye. 

 

"If it isn't Pem, I give it up. He's the best-bred fellow I know." 


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