Main  Contacts  
Table of contents
Coming Home
Old Friends with New Faces
Miss Campbell
Thorns Among the Roses
Prince Charming
Polishing Mac
Phebe
Breakers Ahead
New Year's Calls
The Sad and Sober Part
Small Temptations
At Kitty's Ball
Both Sides
Aunt Clara's Plan
Alas for Charlie!
Good Works
Among the Haycocks
Which Was It?
Behind the Fountain
What Mac Did
How Phebe Earned Her Welcome
Short and Sweet

endeavoring to steer him down the long room without entangling 

his own legs in the tablecloth, treading on his partner's toes, or 

colliding with the furniture. It was very droll, and Rose enjoyed the 

spectacle till Mac, in a frantic attempt to swing around, dashed 

himself against the wall and landed Steve upon the floor. Then it 

was impossible to restrain her laughter any longer and she walked 

in upon them, saying merrily: "It was splendid! Do it again, and I'll 

play for you." 

 

Steve sprang up and tore off the tablecloth in great confusion, 

while Mac, still rubbing his head, dropped into a chair, trying to 

look quite calm and cheerful as he gasped out: "How are you, 

Cousin? When did you come? John should have told us." 

 

"I'm glad he didn't, for then I should have missed this touching 

tableau of cousinly devotion and brotherly love. Getting ready for 

our next party, I see." 

 

"Trying to, but there are so many things to remember all at once 

keep time, steer straight, dodge the petticoats, and manage my 

confounded legs that it isn't easy to get on at first," answered Mac 

with a sigh of exhaustion, wiping his hot forehead. 

 

"Hardest job I ever undertook and, as I'm not a battering ram, I 

decline to be knocked round any longer," growled Steve, dusting 

his knees and ruefully surveying the feet that had been trampled on 

till they tingled, for his boots and broadcloth were dear to the heart 

of the dapper youth. 

 

"Very good of you, and I'm much obliged. I've got the pace, I think, 

and can practice with a chair to keep my hand in," said Mac with 

such a comic mixture of gratitude and resignation that Rose went 

off again so irresistibly that her cousins joined her with a hearty 

roar. 

 

"As you are making a martyr of yourself in my service, the least I 

can do is lend a hand. Play for us, Steve, and I'll give Mac a lesson, 

unless he prefers the chair." And, throwing off her hat and cloak, 

Rose beckoned so invitingly that the gravest philosopher would 

have yielded. 

 

"A thousand thanks, but I'm afraid I shall hurt you," began Mac, 

much gratified, but mindful of past mishaps. 

 

"I'm not. Steve didn't manage his train well, for good dancers 


Page 12 from 15:  Back   1   2   3   4   5   6   7   8   9   10   11  [12]  13   14   15   Forward