Main  Contacts  
Table of contents
Coming Home
Old Friends with New Faces
Miss Campbell
Thorns Among the Roses
Prince Charming
Polishing Mac
Phebe
Breakers Ahead
New Year's Calls
The Sad and Sober Part
Small Temptations
At Kitty's Ball
Both Sides
Aunt Clara's Plan
Alas for Charlie!
Good Works
Among the Haycocks
Which Was It?
Behind the Fountain
What Mac Did
How Phebe Earned Her Welcome
Short and Sweet

left in peace till her Ulysses comes home," said Mac, sitting down 

to read the mottoes sticking out of certain fanciful bonbons on the 

table. 

 

"It is this fuss about Archie which has demoralized us all. Even the 

owl waked up and hasn't got over the excitement yet, you see. He's 

had no experience, poor fellow, so he doesn't know how to 

behave," observed Steve, regarding his bouquet with tender 

interest. 

 

"That's true, and I asked for information because I may be in love 

myself someday and all this will be useful, don't you see?" 

 

"You in love!" And Steve could not restrain a laugh at the idea of 

the bookworm a slave to the tender passion. 

 

Quite unruffled, Mac leaned his chin in both hands, regarding 

them with a meditative eye as he answered in his whimsical way: 

"Why not? I intend to study love as well as medicine, for it is one 

of the most mysterious and remarkable diseases that afflict 

mankind, and the best way to understand it is to have it. I may 

catch it someday, and then I should like to know how to treat and 

cure it." 

 

"If you take it as badly as you did measles and whooping cough, it 

will go hard with you, old fellow," said Steve, much amused with 

the fancy. 

 

"I want it to. No great experience comes or goes easily, and this is 

the greatest we can know, I believe, except death." 

 

Something in Mac's quiet tone and thoughtful eyes made Rose 

look at him in surprise, for she had never heard him speak in that 

way before. Steve also stared for an instant, equally amazed, then 

said below his breath, with an air of mock anxiety: "He's been 

catching something at the hospital, typhoid probably, and is 

beginning to wander. I'll take him quietly away before he gets any 

wilder. Come, old lunatic, we must be off." 

 

"Don't be alarmed. I'm all right and much obliged for your advice, 

for I fancy I shall be a desperate lover when my time comes, if it 

ever does. You don't think it impossible, do you?" And Mac put the 

question so soberly that there was a general smile. 

 

"Certainly not you'll be a regular Douglas, tender and true," 

answered Rose, wondering what queer question would come next. 


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